Tuesday, 18 February 2014


Airship Shape

&

Bristol Fashion

 
To celebrate the launch of Airship Shape & Bristol fashion Bristol Book Blog (BRSBKBLOG) will be running a First lines competition.

Each of the stories in the book are listed below with their first lines. Can you write a Steampunk story title and first line that would fit? Entries by email (detail below). What we're after is a great title and evocative first line only, no need to write the whole story. Word count is up to you but it should be 1 sentance. (not open to the contributors of the book)
First lines from the book -  

Case of the Vapours, by Ken Shinn

“Bodysnatching.”

Brassworth, by Christine Morgan

It’s at times, don’t you know, when I’m aboard an airscrew driven factory, about to meet a captain of industry while pretending to be a peer of the realm, that even I have to stop and ask myself, “Reggie, old bean, how do you get into these predics?”
 

The Lesser Men Have No Language, by Deborah Walker

Visitors to Bristol’s green shaded streets may well be astonished at the city’s multitude of lesser

men.

Brass and Bone, by Joanne Hall

The abyss yawned beneath her feet.

The Girl with Red Hair, by Myfanwy Rodman

In my dreams the city is dying.

Artifice Perdu, by Pete Sutton

Its hand lay upon the trembling bird.

Miss Butler and the Handlander Process, by John Hawkes-Reed

I was hiding inside my father’s test elephant when they came looking for me.

Something In The Water, by Cheryl Morgan

If you are reading these words then I will be dead.

The Chronicles of Montague and Dalton: The Hunt for Alleyway Agnes, by Scott Lewis

The Asiatic Cholera epidemic of 1866 swept through Bristol like the proverbial hot knife through butter.

The Sound of Gyroscopes, by Jonathan L. Howard

We have spoken of Blakes before, and it seems we shall speak of it again.

Flight of Daedalus, by Piotr Świetlik

In the beginning there was light.

The Traveller’s Apprentice, by Ian Millsted

The rusty digging tool hit something metallic.

Lord Craddock: Ascension, by Stephen Blake

Lord Byron Craddock was deemed mad by many, at least strange by most.

The Lanterns of Death Affair, by Andy Bigwood

The hangar doors opened, armoured slats pulling apart to reveal first a line of incandescent sunlight, and then the blue and white cloudscape of an English summer’s day.

 
The prize?

A hardback copy of Airship Shape & Bristol fashion signed by as many of the contributors as I can possibly track down (and/or come to the launch) AND a miniature of Sutton’s Writers Unblock


Tasting Notes -  What better way to enjoy your first trip to Cambridge, than to visit the first distillery in Cambridge?! As a whisky fan, it was no great surprise that Peter’s gin should be rich and complex with plenty of earthy, smoky character. At once spicy, floral and herbaceous, Sutton’s Writers Unblock is best enjoyed with only ice as an accompaniment.

The gradual dilution from slowly melting ice reveals more and more of the character of this gin, allowing time to enjoy the ever changing palate whilst contemplating the important matters in life, such as the correct placing of an apostrophe!

Mail brsbkblog@gmail.com with your entry before the 22nd March.

Winning entries will be chosen by an expert panel and announced at the Airship Ball
 and on the Blog on 29th March.

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